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never liked the politics of new york city or new york state. it was always to me dirty, and it sullied democracy as we knew it. i had to learn a lot about that with the truman story. there is a long chapter in the book. >> we are running out of time, there is so much to ask. where were you born? >> new york city. i went to public schools in new york city. i went to barnard college in manhattan, across the street from columbia. i won a fellowship to get a master's degree in columbia. i wanted to be a journalist. my history professor said, if you want to be a journalist to have to know something, so learn history. journalists do not know enough history. i thought that was good advice. i fell in love with history. i did not have any money to continue, so why was told to apply to rochester, which had fellowships. i applied and got one. i was one to be a historian. i stayed in rochester for two years. i started teaching at columbia. i fell in love with history. >> david herbert donald you met where? >> at columbia. he was one of two young professors they had just hired. i took his lecture c
is changing how the increase in extreme weather we have experienced in new york city may or may not be the result it should compel all elected leaders to take action. governor bloomberg rates we need leadership from the white house. president obama has taken major steps to reduce our current consumption, including higher fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks. he notes that mitt romney, too, has a history of toppling climate change. he signed onto a regional cap and trade plan that would reduce carbon emissions. he could not be more right, but since then he has reversed course, abandoning the very program he once supported. this issue is too important. we need leadership of the national level to move the world and nation forward. that is michael bloomberg endorsing president obama over the issue of climate change and the hurricane sandy fallout. lots of news stories coming from the fallout. the hurricane death toll has been rising. the hurricane sandy death toll now above the 90 and rising as emergency workers canvas flood and fire-ravaged neighborhoods. police say at lea
it go at that. sigh my colleague from new york -- i see my colleague from new york city has arrived here and i'd like her to pick this issue up and talk about the devastation that occurred in her communities and then we can come back to the infrastructure . thank you very much. it's a good -- thank you for joining us. ms. velazquez: i want to thank you for yielding. mr. speaker, if hurricane sandy taught us anything, it is the importance of infrastructure to new york city and our nation. right now new yorkers are struggling with day to day challenges. many of them without power. in certain parts of the metropolitan area, gasoline shortages continue presenting enormous difficulties. but even as new yorkers worked to rebuild and recover for the short-term, we cannot ignore long-term problems. in many ways the city of new york took a number of prudent steps that reduced damage and sped up recovery time. however, it's painfully clear that more must be done in the future to ensure our nation's infrastructure can withstand assault from mother nature. as governor cuomo said, we have a new reali
synopsis of seward's live. >> he is born in new york. not new york city. the rural new york in 1801. he studies law, becomes a lawyer, settles in auburn, new york. this is halfway between albany and buffalo. the day he starts practicing law, he starts practicing politics. he is elected governor of new york in 1888. he is elected to the federal senate in 1869. 1860, he is the favorite for the republican nomination but does not get it. he instead becomes secretary of state under lincoln and served eight years as secretary of state. he retired, travels and on the world, and died in 1872. >> his wife, and daughter, died young. what were the circumstances and years? >> his wife was in ill health through much of the latter part of her life. she is roughly seward's age. she is summoned by the family from auburn, new york, where she spends most of the civil war years, down to washington after the carriage accident. she tends to her husband after the carriage accident. she is there on that terrible night of the assassination attempt. the houses are most painted with blood. for the next two weeks
in place. they were consolidated. we saw that 911 worked well. the mayor's office in new york city talked about, use text in were of you can. leave the phone calls to 911, the really important calls. otherwise use text in order data connections to gather information. >> did it get flooded with information? >> usage was pretty tremendous. whenever you have an issue where there is a lot of people who need information, you find that the networks get flooded. i saw the numbers up to 15,000% increase on some websites. in a lot of the applications stores, the apps that ran to the top or ones that give access information, or the mobil flashlight. -- mobile flashlight. there was a surge in traffic, but i did not see numbers that suggested there was a significant amount of call blocking or dropping. the networks handled the search pretty well. >> we're taping this interview on november 50. i was in lower manhattan last night. i had a lot of trouble connecting on my ipad and on my cell phone. is that still do to sandy? >> there are still areas -- areas that do not have power in the boroughs and low
the tunnels under the east river connecting manhattan and brooklyn and queens are still flooded. new york city took a tremendous hit from the storm. we have over 24 people dead out of an estimated 61 nationwide. two of the largest hospitals in our city were evacuate. i toured nyu medical yesterday. they were talking about during the dark of the night in the storm they really saw courageous work on behalf of the nurses and others of the the hospital. they were carrying newborns out. fema has been coordinating the major disaster relief the. there have been phone calls every day for the new york delegation about how they are responding. there is a great need for food and water in lower manhattan. when you go below 37 street, it is a total blackout. there are no traffic lights or phones. no way to communicate. when you are down there you can not send an e-mail or make a phone call. people are helping each other and directing traffic. the small businesses are afraid that some of them will go out of business because they operate on a fragile business line. their produce, they're derry, their stock i
with the republican governor of new jersey. andthe mayor of new york city who is an independent endorsed president obama. [applause] and the democratic governors of new york and connecticut, to turn the electricity on and clean the debris. what i want to tell you is, cooperation works better when there is no disaster. if he did not have cooperation, disaster. barack obama is a curve and coal operator. -- barack obama is a proven cooperators. [cheers and applause] he even offered in an attempt to get a budget deal, at $1 trillion in spending cuts. they said, thank you very much. no deal. we will not see one penny raised on the wealthiest americans even if it will get rid of $4 trillion in debt. the door is still open. when you re-elect him, they will walk through that door. [cheers and applause] the second reason i am for president obama is he has done a good job with a bad hand. keep in mind, all through 2007 and 2008, then senator obama crossed america with senator clinton and senator joe biden and other good democrats talking about how bad the economy already was. median family income was lower
of a lateral pipeline off the coast of new york city. it will pass under the gateway national recreation area and deliver natural gas to residents of brooklyn and queens. under current law, the national park service does not have the authority to approve the pipeline. therefore, hongman grimm introduced h.r. 2606 to allow the project to move forward benefiting not only new york residents but also visitors to gateway national recreation area. h.r. 2606 has bipartisan support and is supported by the national park service. the house approved its legislation in february. it has passed the senate with noncontroversial amendments. we are now acting to send this to the president. i urge adoption of h.r. 2606 and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from arizona virginia tech. mr. grijalva: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. grijalva: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: we ha
. it was not as enormous as an accomplishment as the civil rights act but the panama canal treaties or rescuing new york city or a saving chrysler, that was all done on a bipartisan basis. that is the way the great senate operated. host: the gulf of tonkin resolution was also on a bipartisan basis. guest: it was within a period of weeks after the civil rights act of 1964 that they did the gulf of tonkin resolution. many of them always regretted doing it. the truth is, they decided to give political cover to president johnson during the 1964 campaign. the wanted to stand by the president. they never intended, none of them, intended it to be a blank check to enlarge the vietnam war. they regretted having died and he started using it that way. from 1964 on, the senate was the focal point of the opposition to the war. democrats opposing it during president johnson's term, republicans joining them as well, president nixon's term, the second moral imperative that these centers dealt with was ending the war. host: can there be a parallel drawn between the actions of the senate in that period and the support of
, and that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, huge amount of damage. they have incredible new york city is resilient, and how well they are coming back. i think they got about 95% of their transit operations, rail was particularly hit. almost all of east side lower manhattan tunnels flooded, and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all passengers in the world in new york city. and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg, we met with yesterday, will be in town today, and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee overseas -- oversees and also transportation and infrastructure that was hurt. that may be the subject of additional scrutiny by the committee, but today, again, we are focused on looking particularly at amtrak's structural organization. i might also recall that with the last hearing what we'll be doing on the northeast c
. my story began in another big city in new york. right before 9/11. i was working at j.p. morgan at 60 wall street. i was in the new york national guard. i never thought my first mobilization would be at ground zero. i have come from a military family. my grandfather was drafted in world war two in the bronx. he served three years in the south pacific. vietnam. back then, every family was a military family. i wanted to get back. -- i want to give back. i never thought it was dark in manhattan. -- i never thought it would start in manhattan. my story is not unique. many people have answered this call. this generation of veterans is not a charity. they are an investment. it is one of the strongest investments we can make at a critical time in american history. i want to tell you a story via video about a man who grew up not far from chicago and is one of the many members of iava. >> i took the hard road. my story has been a story of success and survival. my name is nicholas. colgan. i deployed to afghanistan from january 2007 until april 2008. it is hard to come home. war can transform y
have the worst conditions ever in the 108-year history of the new york city subway system. the tunnels are under water. the response from the federal government has been extraordinary. from the president and all of his secretaries. they are sending down over 200 pumps, generators to help remove the water, the saltwater from the subway system so we can ascertain the damage and start to restore service. they have partial small service throughout the city, but the tunnels under the east river connecting manhattan and brooklyn and queens, are still flooded. new york city took a tremendous hit from the storm. we have reported over 24 people dead. that is out of an estimated 61 nationwide. two of the largest hospitals in our city, bellevue and n.y.u. medical center, were evacuated. i toured n.y.u. medical yesterday, and i'm touring bellevue today as parts of queens in lower manhattan. they were talking about during the dark in the night of this storm, they really saw courageous work on behalf of the nurses and others at n.y.u. medical. they were carrying fragile newborns out. the other hospi
cases to happen. that has been changed. when i was head of the teacher'' union in new york city, i tried to get that policy changed and made lots of proposals, but the government did not want to do it. at the end of the day, it has to be about somebody of good character, somebody who wants to teach, somebody who knows how to teach. those of the ones who should be teaching. that is what we have in schools across the country. if there is an issue people should get due process, but due process should not be a job for life. we have to make sure people are treated fairly, but also that kids get the best teachers possible. host: lester to new jersey and hear from david on a democrat line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i am a teacher, and i would like to address a lot of the things that came up with the caller. this last caller, about in the classroom, as i am sure ms. weingarten, i taught in new york city, and one of the things i learned a long time ago is when there was disrespect in the classroom a lot of it came from the home. if it was not respect in the home or respect for authori
experienced in new york city may or may not be the result it should compel all elected leaders to take action. governor bloomberg rates we need leadership from the white house. president obama has taken major steps to reduce our current consumption, including higher fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks. he notes that mitt romney, too, has a history of toppling climate change. he signed onto a regional cap and trade plan that would reduce carbon emissions. he could not be more right, but since then he has reversed course, abandoning the very program he once supported. this issue is too important. we need leadership of the national level to move the world and nation forward. that is michael bloomberg endorsing president obama over the issue of climate change and the hurricane sandy fallout. lots of news stories coming from the fallout. the hurricane death toll has been rising. the hurricane sandy death toll now above the 90 and rising as emergency workers canvas flood and fire-ravaged neighborhoods. police say at least 59 people were killed during a storm in new york city and a new jer
a significant experience in the public and private sector and lives in new york city. host: how about a question or comment on the budget talks in the fiscal cliff? caller: i would like to talk about that. >> when you speak we need to broaden the tax base and you want to ask the poor people, because at this country that is in poverty or close to party, and you want them to not only pay a payroll tax and you want that to go away, but you don't want the rich to basically -- you want to keep their tax cuts but you want to add an income tax on top of their payroll tax for the port, how do you justify that? guest: first of all, what i said was a majority of americans pay more in payroll taxes and income taxes. the poverty rate in the united states is 15.9%. 46.4% of americans don't pay income taxes. obviously, if you are near poor, you could argue he should not have to pay income taxes. i don't know what the right amount is, somewhere between 15.9% and 46.4%, but i think it is a lot closer to 15.9%. i believe, and as i said before, that we need to increase the effective tax rate of individuals who ar
elections. >> recent thri museum of jewish heritage in new york city hosted a conversation on the role of embedded jurne lists. they discuss their role as journalists in iraq afghanistan and columbia. this is about 50 minutes. >> thank you for the introductions. i would like to thank you in advance. we are talking about the ethics of journalists. i am not a journalist. i am a historian. what you guys call this? do you refer to being embedded as -- how do we talk about this? >> an embed means -- you could be with the military and not be embedded. i signed a contract with the military. as far as i know, this is pretty much invented by the military and all this terminology, before that, you would just say, i am reporting with the army. >> there is an indication with embedded that you are living with them and you have shelter, food, and are with them. >> you can rely on them for food and security. we only refer to embeds as far as the military. >> it is about journalists who are working during world war ii. >> journalists were given a rank. the word embedded was not called that. it fell ou
. thank you. goodbye. guest: new york city has been spending a lot of money in recent years like this too would predict that the sewage system and infrastructure. it is probably not even up. i think pomost people would acknowledge that. the city has done a lot to upgrade, but infrastructure and a lot of places is what made it a great city 100 years ago. the subway systems, water tunnels, these are 100-years-old in some places. they are reaching the point where they are expensive to repair a leak repaired offered -- repaired often. that will be a big focus. that is something the city and state will be looking at going forward. in "the newtory today york times" -- how does the federal government help with this, or does it? guest: i do not know if it does. and a lot of cases they're sending in trucks to help deal with this. some of the towns are overwhelmed. and a lot of cases they will end up pay for the overtime of the workers. this will obviously be a huge drain on cities like hoboken. i talked to the mayor of reverse city, new jersey. same problem. they say they pull up with the 30 foot
to confront the threat of climate change than your opponent. tomorrow you're going up to new york city where you're going to, i assume, see people still suffering the effects of hurricane sandy which many people say is further evidence of how a warming globe is changing our weather. what specifically do you plan to do in a sec term to tackle the issue of climate change? and do you think the political will exists in washington to pass legislation that could include some kind of attacks on carbon? >> you know, as you know, mark, we can't attribute any particular weather event to climate change. what we do know is the temperature around the globe is increasing. faster than was predicted even 10 years ago. we do know that the arctic icecap is melting, faster than was predicted even five years ago. we do know there have been extraordinarily -- there have been an extraordinarily large number of severe weather events here in north america but also around the globe. and i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacting by human behavior and by carbon emissions and i think we hav
and trenton from here. [cheers and applause] i want them to hear you in new york city. [cheers and applause] i want them to hear you in washington, d.c. can you do that? we will be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> you hurt governor tom corbett. the bus has arrived. -- you heard governor tom corbett. we will take your calls. a democratic column. go ahead, carl. caller: i am concerned about this election. i am from the 82nd airborne. i was loaded onto planes during the cuban crisis. we found out later than kennedy gave up our missiles in turkey and averted a crisis. you have to be aggressive, but you cannot be crazy. romney is a global list -- globalist. he is a complete sony and i am scared to death if he becomes president. host: david, a republican color. caller: i am for romney all the way. he is for god and country. there are a lot of people out of war. if romney were president -- out of work right now. if romney were present, the people on the east coast would not be suffering like the are now. host: are you energize? caller: yes, i am energized. it is going to be good against evil. caller: i am
. an event hosted earlier today in new york city. on c-span 2, president obama. that is all tonight on the c- span network beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> the name of this place still resonates with the shuddering in the hearts of the american people. more than any other name in the civil war except abraham lincoln. what happened here was the crux of our terrible national trial. even americans who are not sure precisely what transpired know all the glory and all the tragedy we associate with the civil war resides most probably -- palpably here. >> next, remarks from federal communications commission chairman julius genachowski. he spoke at an event earlier today. it is one hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining the conversation with julius genachowski. normal rules that you are all familiar with. welcome to our meeting today. please completely turned off yourself phones, blackberrys, and all wireless devices. as a reminder, this meeting is on the record. i am very excited to be here today. this is perhaps the most anticipated cfr event. i am glad the chairman can join us today. a
at games with poverty and games of money. one of my favorite examples was a group out of new york city called the area code. if you are looking at lots of examples of creative solutions to problems, is one to look at. they did a game around money where communities in the south that have high rates of mortgage defaults, and low rates of savings, and they made up a currency called macon money. macon, georgia, so they had macon money. ads in dollar bills but all of them have been cut in half. they gave out all this money, but they were all half a dollar bill. the currency could be used in local stores in services like cash, but you had to find the other person with half of your bill, and they created a social gaming environment where you could meet up. if we met in a coffee shop we could use its air, and it created a social layer and physical community to transform the community and also bring positive of motions, that you have solved this problem and have success, and it is really interesting. basically, my answer is yes. there are so many crazy things you can thing to do with a game des
? the assassination of john kennedy at 730 p.m. president obama traveled to the new york city area to assess damage from hurricane sandy. on staten island, he visited a recovery center. he was joined by new york city mayor michael bloomberg, homeland security secretary janet napolitano, and others. >> good afternoon, on behalf of all new yorkers, mr. president, it is an honor to welcome you here to our city. we are here with our two great senators, and the governor and i wanted to particularly thank you and particularly thank all the volunteers who have worked so hard for the last two weeks. 24/7 a lot of them, they have made all the difference. we are getting out of this. we are getting ahead. we did lose 23 staten islanders here, one was police officer artur, whose funeral i went to. someone unfortunately this city will miss. we are making our ways back. mr. president, thank you particularly for all the help we have gotten from fema, from homeland secretary napolitano who is with us, from human -- health and human services secretary, and all of your team, craig fugate from fema, the borough presi
can not to endorse the president largely on that issue. the freak storm ravaged new york city. when storms like that happen, it does help consensus. i do not think that will be at the top of the agenda. immigration reform is probably more of the momentum behind that. >> there are two issues that have changed dramatically, 180 degrees. one is gay rights. this country went to a much broader acceptance of gay rights and gay marriage. just stunning. part is a democratic shift. the other is a climate change. there was a big movement among evangelicals to save the lord's earth, to save the greatest gift we were given. it made a lot of sense with the far right's agenda. it has been turned into the exact opposite. climate change is happening and it is partially caused by human kind. that is happening just a few years after both parties in a pretty wide degree that something had to be done for different reasons. stunning. >> somebody was compiling the best tweets of the campaign. "i agree with the scientific consensus on global warming. call me crazy." that's where things were. there could b
of new york city who is an independent and endorsed president obama. the democratic governors of the york and connecticut, to turn the electricity on and clean the debris. what i want to tell you is, cooperation works better when there is the disaster. if he did not have cooperation, you have the makings of a disaster. barack obama is a curve and coal operator. [cheers and applause] he even offered in an attempt to get a budget deal, at one trillion dollars in spending cuts. they said, thank you very much. no deal. we will not see one penny raised on the loftiest americans even if it will get rid of $4 trillion in debt. the door is still open. would you re-elect him, they will walk through that door [cheers and applause] the sec and to resent i am for president obama is he has done a good job with a bad hand it. keep in mind, author 2007 and two dozen it, then senator obama crossed america with center clinton and senator joe biden and other good democrats of talking about how bad the economy already was median family income was lower than that was the data left office. poverty was up. all
, this update from c-span radio. >> its 8:33 a.m. eastern. an update on new york city following sandy. some of the subways are rolling again. and a train pulled out of penn station three days after the tunnels were flooded. the chairman says 14 of the city's 23 subway lines will be operating today. none of the trains will be going into lower manhattan. it is still dealing with a massive black out. the subways usually carry 5.2 million passengers a day. experts and shoreline advocates a new jersey should consider protection of coastal areas as a massive -- major part of any plan to rebuild areas ruined by hurricane sandy. they say redevelopment plans should include relocating homes and businesses farther from the shoreline, building more seawalls, and keeping sand dunes high. in the aftermath, it's back to the campaign trail for president obama. he is scheduled to appear in wisconsin, nevada, colorado today. mitt romney is scheduled to be in battleground virginia to talk , which will talk about in a moment. we will cover running at 2:00 p.m. on c-span and the president at 9:00 in colorado. w
in quarantine in 2003 by the new york city health department. it can be done locally. >> i am going to end with two observations that are very cheerful to me and in a constitutionally very gloomy person. i think it very cheerful, very encouraging, very reassuring that we have professionals like you have heard from tonight working on the subject and very encouraging that we have people like you in the gene in the subject, coming out on a night like this -- engaging in the subject, coming out on and i like this to hear about this. -- on a night like this to hear about this. thank you. [applause] >> on behalf of the academy, i would like to thank our excellent panelists and invite you to join us for a drink or a soft drink in the lobby. there will be a book signing. thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> here is a look at our prime- time lineup tonight on the c- span networks. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke gives his economic outlook from an event hosted earlier today in new york city. on
, the new york city police commissioner nominated by president bush to be part of his department of all land -- homeland security. they didn't vett him carefully because later he pleaded tuilty to -- guilty to fraud. or the designation as secretary of labor that had to be withdrawn the next week because a woman gave her some money and it may or may not have been illegal. but she had misled the vetters, and they threw her under the bus. after the governor romney campaign, there may be a new set of questions. it is a difficult thing if you are nominated to a prestigious post as an officer of the united states. the most important part happens in the senate. for instance, bill clinton wanted to support -- appoint robert reich. robert founded intimidating to be at hearings in front of the senate. he wrote a book called lost in the cabinet. these are sometimes known as murder boards. you can see why it is called that. he is explaining in his book, the preparation and his aides helping him get to the nomination process and practicing with him. i am planning for a confirmation hearing, i feel like a
challenging time for new york city. i think you have shown quite a bit of fortitude in coming back and getting back to business. my remarks today are going to focus on the reasons for the disappointingly slow pace of economic recovery in the united states, and the policy actions that have been taken by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three years, but at a slow pace. the unemployment r
. mayor bloomberg can not to endorse the president largely on that issue. the freak storm ravaged new york city. when storms like that happen, it does help consensus. i do not think that will be at the top of the agenda. immigration reform is probably more of the momentum behind that. >> there are two issues that have changed dramatically, 180 degrees. one is gay rights. this country went to a much broader acceptance of gay rights and gay marriage. just stunning. part is a democratic shift. the other is a climate change. there was a big movement among evangelicals to save the lord's earth, to save the greatest gift we were given. it made a lot of sense with the far right's agenda. it has been turned into the exact opposite. climate change is happening and it is partially caused by human kind. that is happening just a few years after both parties in a pretty wide degree that something had to be done for different reasons. stunning. >> somebody was compiling the best tweets of the campaign. "i agree with the scientific consensus on global warming. call me crazy." that's where things were. th
of new york. it creates more jobs in the manufacturing and services sector in new york city. new york and russia have a special relationship. last year new york exported $497 million worth of goods to russia which directly supported an estimated 1,400 jobs. additionally, new york city is home to one of the largest russian communities in the united states. and that i am very proud to say i represent. so i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of american jobs and vote aye on h.r. 6156, and, madam speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan, mr. levin. mr. levin: how much time remains on each side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan, mr. levin, has nine minutes. and the gentleman from michigan, mr. camp, has 15 1/2 minutes. mr. levin: mr. chairman, i think i'll proceed. shall i do that? it's now my pleasure to yield a minute and a half to another vigorous member of our committee on all issues, mr. pascrell from the state of new jersey. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey
kind. >> i could not agree more. at my alma mater at the city college of new york, we had a specific program at the powell center that i am happy to have named after me there and we take in gi's. we have mentoring program set for them. we have programs that get them up to speed if they have some weakness in their earlier academic career that needs correction, and we have money that is used to supplement not only their academic costs but the costs of living. more universities are doing that. it is important now because the economy is still in a weak state, slowly improving, but still weak. this affects our veterans. unlike after world war ii or after korea or vietnam, you can come back and find a job that does not require the highest skill or if in world war ii you worked in a car factory before the war, when the war was over, and they started making cars again, you could just go right back in. increasingly, our society is becoming more complex. our economy is becoming more complex. you need a higher level of school especially with respect to the information revolution. i used to be a
will be announced when they are available. >> new york city or new york area? >> new york area. >> earlier today the president queened a call with homeland security, fema chief of staff and other senior members of his team. on the call the president received an update on the latest response and recovery efforts in the affected area. he also heard from fema administrator on the latest efforts to meet the continuing power and fuel challenges facing affected communities as well as ongoing work of the governors and their teams for housing solutions for the families. administrator is in new york survey i have aing damage and ongoing response recovery efforts t. president directed his team to bring all available resources to bear to support our state and local partners and not allow red tape to stand in the way of federal support that can be provided t. president will continue to receive updates on the response and recovery efforts from his team. and with that i'll take your questions. >> thanks and welcome to the lame duck session. we just heard the president say two things, one is that he's not [ina
live. may be different in new york verses kansas city but at point social security should kick in but someone making 400,000 dollars a year clearly doesn't need it. that's my comments. >> thank you and our app is available for mobile device. you can get to c-span radio at c-span radio.org. the headline from the working on the post. aarp flexing muscle in talks saying it doesn't want to raise the social security age and we ask if you think this should be part of a larger discussion as congress deals not only with the fiscal cliff but the looming debt and deficit and now approaching 16-point 7 trillion dollars. congress out this week for the thanksgiving holiday returning next monday and tuesday. chris from virginia. republican line. good morning. >> i thought that throwing my two cents on this. every discussion and every editorial that i read in the major papers talks about either cutting spending or raising taxes and i think one of the pieces and it's a big piece is this problem is not being discussed pretty much anywhere and that's selling assets. the federal government contro
in new york city? host: he was from new york. i believe and he's left. >> ok. i was going to see how he weathered sandy. this is not just what happens at altar. i don't think as many americans would be concerned. but what we've seen now is we've seen five, six states that have moved down this route mostly because of the courts or in some case state legislators but never by the people. what we've seen is that this alters a lot of what we understand as a society. it's not just about two people who love each other. or want to commit themselves to each other. it's about what's taught to our children the curriculum in our public schools, that children are taught that hetro sexuality and homosexuality are socially and morely equal. that there's no difference and that cournts what many parents believe and are teaching their children. so it pits the government between parent and child. and then we've seen actually religious organization that is have refused to allow their centers of worship to be used for same sex marriages and civil ceremonies lose their tax exemption. so this is not just abou
administration, he has a significant experience in the public and private sector and lives in new york city. host: how about a question or comment on the budget talks in the fiscal cliff? caller: i would like to talk about that. >> when you speak we need to broaden the tax base and you want to ask the poor people, because at this country that is in poverty or close to party, and you want them to not only pay a payroll tax and you want that to go away, but you don't want the rich to basically -- you want to keep their tax cuts but you want to add an income tax on top of their payroll tax for the port, how do you justify that? guest: first of all, what i said was a majority of americans pay more in payroll taxes and income taxes. the poverty rate in the united states is 15.9%. 46.4% of americans don't pay income taxes. obviously, if you are near poor, you could argue he should not have to pay income taxes. i don't know what the right amount is, somewhere between 15.9% and 46.4%, but i think it is a lot closer to 15.9%. i believe, and as i said before, that we need to increase the effective tax rate
working with the republican governor of new jersey. the mayor of new york city who is an independent endorsed president obama. the democratic governors of new york and connecticut, to turn the electricity on and clean the debris. what i want to tell you is, cooperation works better when there is no disaster. if he did not have cooperation, you have the makings of a disaster. barack obama is a curve and coal operator. [cheers and applause] he even offered in an attempt to get a budget deal, at $1 trillion in spending cuts. they said, thank you very much. no deal. we will not see one penny raised on the wealthiest americans even if it will get rid of $4 trillion in debt. the door is still open. when you re-elect him, they will walk through that door. [cheers and applause] the second reason i am for president obama is he has done a good job with a bad hand. keep in mind, all through 2007 and 2008, then senator obama crossed america with senator clinton and senator joe biden and other good democrats talking about how bad the economy already was. median family income was lower than that w
that you're doing which and i just returned from two days in new york city myself over the weekend. and i will say what i saw was sobering. i visited families and communityties that had been devastated and i will say quite personally as a native new yorker and housing commissioner in new york city, visiting family, i attended a funeral yesterday for the daughter of a friend who was killed in the storm as well as seeing a very very large scale development that i remember the planning of, i remember cutting the ribbon with mayor broomberg and to now see that entire development flooded, it was particularly moving to me. all of those experiences. but i also saw remarkable courage and strength that i know is a hall mark of new yorkers and of those residents of the entire riegenn recovering. i met one woman whose home had burned to the ground. she had lost a relative in 9/11. and not long before that i had watched flight 586 crash just a few blocks fwr her home. and she was taking strength and preparing to rebuild once again. so remarkable efforts. and also i visited one of the disaster recover
an event for morgan stanley up in new york city and their headquarters over looking the city you get a real sense of you are somebody in power and while we're waiting for the guests to arrive that i was supposed to talk to, some of the morgan stanley investment bankers were talking to me and this one young guy came up and said it must have really bothered you to not have made much money as you served in the military and became chairman. that must have really bothered you. i said we never thought about it. you had to think about that and talk to your piers about this all the time. i said no. and the conclusion that was the difference between military culture and that culture was like night and day. they serve for the bonus for the money and we serve for other reasons that we've talked about. and that's a very noble thing. and you have heard it for the last several days. war is not glorious but the service of people to their country can be glorious and you've heard some real heroes talk about this service, service is something bigger than yourself, selfless service. really important character
and its aftermath. it has been a very challenging time for new york city. i think you have shown quite a bit of fortitude in coming back and getting back to business. my remarks today are going to focus on the reasons for the disappointingly slow pace of economic recovery in the united states, and the policy actions that have been taken by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three
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